Once you have the piece of content you want to repurpose and the keywords you’re optimizing for, Google it. Type in the keywords and hit enter. Then, compare your content to the content that’s front and center on page one. What are they talking about that you’re not? Are there any topics you need to add? Is the content even relevant to what you’re trying to say? Based on the content, what can you assume the user’s intent is with that particular keyword?
If both page are closely related (lots of topical overlap), I would merge the unique content from the lower ranking article into the top ranking one, then 301 redirect the lower performing article into the top ranking one. This will make the canonical version more relevant, and give it an immediate authority boost. I would also fetch it right away, do some link building, and possibly a little paid promotion to seed some engagement. Update the time stamp.

Organic traffic means when you post something on your website today & get traffic tomorrow, day after tomorrow, next week, next month and so on. Organic traffic is the hardest thing you will ever get on your business website. But it is the best thing to put your efforts & time up for as you will get ever flowing traffic to your website. There are certain ways you can get traffic to your website for e.g. using paid Facebook promoted posts and Google Ad Words which will provide you enough traffic that would look pleasing. But what will happen when you stop paying; will it be possible then that your content is seen? That’s why organic traffic is the best way which comes forever and without any charges.


There is an excellent tool, a plugin, that helps you do this seamlessly. It’s called Yoast SEO and it’s available in a free or paid version. When you start writing your posts, the “Yoast Internal Linking” sidebar opens up and suggests which posts you should be linking to. The primary suggestions are always to cornerstone content, while the other link suggestions are for similar posts or keywords.
Optimise for your personas, not search engines. First and foremost, write your buyer personas so you know to whom you’re addressing your content. By creating quality educational content that resonates with you>r ideal buyers, you’ll naturally improve your SEO. This means tapping into the main issues of your personas and the keywords they use in search queries. Optimising for search engines alone is useless; all you’ll have is keyword-riddled nonsense.
The first step that I take is to do a quick Google search to find pages on my domain where I've mentioned the keyword in question so that I can add an internal link. To do this, I'll use the following search query, replacing DOMAIN with your domain name (e.g. matthewbarby.com) and KEYWORD with the keyword you're targeting (e.g. "social media strategy"):

In just two weeks after publishing this post, I went to Google and searched for the full title of this blog post, “Best 7 Strategies To Increase Organic Search Traffic”. To my surprise, I ranked No. 2 back then. Today, Jan 3, 2019, I was updating this post, so I checked it again. There I am, ranked at No. 1 on Google Search!! So, dear reader, the strategies highlighted here do work! By applying the strategies I have mentioned in this post, I have increased my chances of ranking it on Google.
Everyone wants to rank for those broad two or three word key phrases because they tend to have high search volumes. The problem with these broad key phrases is they are highly competitive. So competitive that you may not stand a chance of ranking for them unless you devote months of your time to it. Instead of spending your time going after something that may not even be attainable, go after the low-hanging fruit of long-tail key phrases.
For a long time, digital marketers summed up the properties of direct and organic traffic pretty similarly and simply. To most, organic traffic consists of visits from search engines, while direct traffic is made up of visits from people entering your company URL into their browser. This explanation, however, is too simplified and leaves most digital marketers short-handed when it comes to completely understanding and gaining insights from web traffic, especially organic and direct sources.
Direct traffic is defined as visits with no referring website. When a visitor follows a link from one website to another, the site of origin is considered the referrer. These sites can be search engines, social media, blogs, or other websites that have links to other websites. Direct traffic categorizes visits that do not come from a referring URL.

The first step that I take is to do a quick Google search to find pages on my domain where I've mentioned the keyword in question so that I can add an internal link. To do this, I'll use the following search query, replacing DOMAIN with your domain name (e.g. matthewbarby.com) and KEYWORD with the keyword you're targeting (e.g. "social media strategy"):
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