LinkedIn has become much more than a means of finding another job. The world’s largest professional social network is now a valuable publishing platform in its own right, which means you should be posting content to LinkedIn on a regular basis. Doing so can boost traffic to your site, as well as increase your profile within your industry – especially if you have a moderate to large following.
This isn’t necessarily anything really technical, but rather subjective. In my humble content marketing opinion, perfection is overrated. Now, does that mean you get to skip out on the research and publish crap? No, no. Instead, it means that there is a point of diminishing returns and sometimes, it’s better to ship it, assess performance, and revise.
Simply great and agree with your all subject...! I like the way you explained. Each heading are awesome Create the best quality content and consistently, Long tail keyword is better, Guest blog for SEO is dead, and Aha....Do not anger Google. conclusion is awesome. Hard work and Patient is best practice to see the good results in any field. Really useful and helpful post indeed. Thank you.
Posting every other day or skipping days rather than regularly posting on your website will not be going to attract traffic to your website. So, you should always have enough content in your hand that you can post regularly. One of the major benefits that regular posting will give you is that you will have regular traffic on your website which ultimately going to increase your organic traffic. Another thing is that your talent or skill will sharpen with regular writing & posting content. If you have a busy schedule or running a business at the same time, then you should hire writers to assist you.
All we found useful with this app was a link to download the Alexa toolbar, but that doesn't justify the steep asking price for this ineffective tool. There's a note that the registered program offers additional benefits, but doesn't elaborate. Frankly, this application seems designed to lure users to directing traffic to the unfamiliar site. We can't recommend it to any user for any reason.

Organic traffic is the primary channel that inbound marketing strives to increase. This traffic is defined as visitors coming from a search engine, such as Google or Bing. This does not include paid search ads, but that doesn’t mean that organic traffic isn’t impacted by paid search or display advertising, either positively or negatively. In general, people trust search engines, and sayings such as “just Google it” reinforce that humans are tied to the search engine. Thus, paid search, display, or even offline campaigns can drive searches, which may increase organic traffic while those campaigns are running.

Hey, Matt! Thank you for your sharing, and I learned much from it, but I still have a question. We began to do SEO work for our site 2 years ago, and our organic traffic grew 5 times ( from 8K to 40K every day). But two years later, it is very difficult to get it grow more, even it drop to 3.2K every day. So can you give me any advice to make our site's traffic grow again? Thank you in advance!
Mobile traffic: In the Groupon experiment mentioned above, Groupon found that both browser and device matter in web analytics’ ability to track organic traffic. Although desktops using common browsers saw a smaller impact from the test (10-20 percent), mobile devices saw a 50 percent drop in direct traffic when the site was de-indexed. In short, as mobile users grow, we are likely to see direct traffic rise even more from organic search traffic.
Monster-Traffic is another traffic exchange, though it’s initially a little off-putting due to the 1995-style website. It’s a free for all styled advertising list, where anyone signing up becomes part of the audience and an advertiser at the same time. You sign up and you can enter a link into their system, and that link is added to a roster that is send out to every member of the group. Additionally, registration allows a free solo ad; an ad that isn’t drowned out by other advertisers in that mailer.
Help your contributors out by clearly outlining who they should be writing to (your target audience), how you want them to portray your company, brand, service, or product (make sure it’s on brand), sharing a few examples of great content out there (politely nudge them to fulfill your content marketing vision), and encouraging them to include links to research, etc. (SEO best practices).
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
If you haven’t used software like BuzzSumo to check out what your competitors are up to, you’re at a huge disadvantage. These services aggregate the social performance of specific sites and content to provide you with an at-a-glance view of what topics are resonating with readers and, most importantly, making the rounds on social media. Find out what people are reading (and talking about), and emulate that kind of content to bring traffic to your website.
Optimise for your personas, not search engines. First and foremost, write your buyer personas so you know to whom you’re addressing your content. By creating quality educational content that resonates with you>r ideal buyers, you’ll naturally improve your SEO. This means tapping into the main issues of your personas and the keywords they use in search queries. Optimising for search engines alone is useless; all you’ll have is keyword-riddled nonsense.
PBP is sort of a cross between a traffic generator and a multi-level marketing scheme, only without the threats that MLM traditionally entails. You’re not absolutely required to sign up under someone, though the program does cost money on a monthly basis. You’re granted access to traffic generation tools, as well as other promotional information and training. The MLM comes in with their referral commissions, which many people use more than the marketing tools themselves. There’s a sizable commission for enrolling new members, as well as seeing them succeed.
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